Learn To Play I Remember You: Diana Krall

English: Johnny Mercer, New York, N.Y., betwee...
English: Johnny Mercer, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948 (Photograph by William P. Gottlieb) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


 I Remember You is from the Paramount Picture The Fleet's In. The song was written by Johnny Mercer in 1942, along with the music by Victor Schertzinger. Recorded by Jimmy Dorsey in 1942 and the Slim Whitman sings it like a classic country song.

It's played in the Key of G with 4/4 time signature. Moderately, not too fast. Here it is on YouTube.




Intro: G - Gdim - C6 - Am/G 
 
G = GD/BDF#
Gdim = GE/A#C#F#
G6 = GD/GBE
Am/G = G/CEB
 
 G           Gdim
I remember you --

G                   F      G7sus  G7   C6
You're the one who made my dreams come true

  Cm   D7b9   G  D7sus  D7
A few kisses ago.


G           Gdim
I remember you --

  G                F        G7sus G7  Cmaj7
You're the one who said, "I love you, too."  

C6  Cm D7b9       Dm7/G   G9
I do...didn't you know?


Bridge:

C         F#m7    B7      E      F#m7      B7    
I remember, too a distant bell       and stars that

Emaj7 E6       Em7  A7          Dmaj7  D6  D7
Fell  like the rain out of the blue


G                 Gdim
When my life is through      

G             Bm7b5   E7b9    Am  
And the angels ask me to recall

Cm   Cm6           G    
The thrill of them all

 A9           G       G/B Bbdim7 Am7 D7b9 G  
Then I shall tell them I remem- ber you.


(Instrumental interlude - 1 Verse)


(Repeat Bridge)


G                  Gdim
When my life is through      

G             Bm7b5   E7b9   Am  Cm
And the angels ask me to recall

     Cm6           G   A9
The thrill of them all

              G         G/B Bbdim7 Am7 D7b9      
Then I shall tell them I remem - ber 

Bb            Cm
Tell them I remember
 
G  A7b9 D13 G 
you. 

Here are some different inversions for the same chords throughout the song.



A7: AG/C#G

A9: 

G/C#EB
AG/C#B

A7b9: AG/C#F#Bb

Am7: AG/CEG

B7: A/D#F#B

Bm7b5: B/DFAD

Bbdim7: Bb/C#E

Cmaj7: C/BE

C6: GE/A

Cm: 

C/GCEb
GC/CEbC

Cm6: A/EGC

D7: 

D/F#CD
D/CF#

D7sus: AD/GCD

D7b9: DF#/CEbA

Dm7/G = G/ACF

D6: AF#/B

D13: DF#/CEB

E: EB/EF#G#

Emaj7: E/D#G#

E6: EG#/C#E

Em7: EB/BDG

E7b9: E/DF#G#D

F: AF/CF

F#m7: F#/C#EG

G Major:

GD/BDF#
GD/ABD
DB/DGB
GDB/DGD

Gdim: GE/A#C#F#

G7sus: GF#/C

G7: GF#/BD

G/B: BG/D


You may be interested in Jazz Intensive Training Center

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Hope you had a wonderful Christmas. Wishing you a Happy New Year!


 

"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Monday Music Quote: Vladimir Horowitz


Monday Music Quote


 Monday Music Quote: Vladimir Horowitz


The great pianist Vladimir Horowitz once said:

"Perfection itself is imperfection."

"Played percussively, the piano is a bore. If I go to a concert and someone plays like that I have two choices: go home or go to sleep. The goal is to make the piano sing, sing, sing."
Vladimir Horowitz as he appeared at the time R...
Vladimir Horowitz as he appeared at the time Rachmaninoff met him (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


1. Top tracks can be heard, here.

2. More track listings, here.

3. Horowitz on YouTube

4. Vladimir Bio

 5. Free Sheet Music

Changing Your Piano Speed 

 

Tempo is the speed of any piece of music. Just like driving a car and seeing the 45 M.P.H. speed sign, it is the same for Tempo words in music.

At the very top left hand corner, on the beginning page of your sheet music, you will often see a word that tells you how fast or how slow to play a particular song. Sometimes you will be asked to slow down your speed of playing in a particular passage.

Usually you will find that these tempo words are written in Italian. Here are some of the more common Italian words you will discover in music. It does help to memorize most of these words. Having flash cards to quiz yourself is a very good idea.
 
Slow Tempo Marks:

Adagio (play with ease)
Largo (very slow and broad)
Lento (very slow)
Grave (heavy and solemn)

Medium Tempo Marks:

Andante (a moderate, graceful, walking tempo)
Andantino (a little slower than andante)
Moderato (a moderate tempo)
Molto (very)
Larghetto (somewhat slow)

Fast Tempo Marks:

Allegretto (lively and quick but a little slower than Allegro))
Allegro (cheerful, fast and quick)
Vivace (lively and brisk)
Presto (very fast)
Prestissimo (very, very fast)

Right in the middle of a piece, you will see that the composer has decided he wants you to slow down. Look for a new tempo marking at the very beginning of a new section. Here's what to look for.

Gradually Getting Faster:

Accelerando (becoming gradually faster and abbreviated accel.)
Stringendo (quickening)

Gradually Getting Slower:

Ritardando (becoming gradually slower and abbreviated rit.)
Ritenuto (held back)
Rallentando (becoming gradually slower)
Rattenuto (holding back and slowing down)

When you slow down at the end of a phrase of music or a particular section of a composition, you will notice at the start of the next section a new word, a tempo. This means to go back to the original tempo. It is like slowing down while driving a car because you see a sign that says, "Speed Reduced Ahead.", and then going back up to the regular speed limit once again.

Now your piano practice sounds playful and energetic while observing accelerando. Sometimes your moderato walking tempo sounds smooth dance-like. Time completely changes within a song all because you changed speed when playing the piano. The pace of a piece of music becomes alive because you have observed tempo marks with expression. Well done.



Hanon Finger Exercises


If you're looking for tips on how to move your piano fingers faster, I recommend Hanon Exercises


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 "Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Top Ten Posts for Piano Diana


Piano Diana: Top Blog Posts 2014
photo credit: columbia114

 It's always refreshing to glance back over the year and learn from my past blogger posts. Here's an overall view just in case you missed something. Thanks for stopping by and supporting my blog.

1. Esperanza Spalding: I Know You Know

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2. Hezekiah Walker: I Need You To Survive

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3. Top Ten Jazz Books

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4. Above All: Paul Baloche

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5. Martha Munizzi: God Is Here

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6. Kirk Franklin: Awesome God

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7. Chords To Bridge Over Troubled Waters

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8. Music Alphabet and Staff

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9. Virtual Keyboard: New Software Tool

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10. Free Christmas Sheet Music Sites

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 Jermaine Griggs is having a super sale with 60% off, along with free shipping. You might want to research it and pick up another music resource,  Christmas Keys1

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 "Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Diana Krall: Let's Face The Music And Dance


Let's Face The Music And Dance Music Score

 Irving Berling wrote a popular song in 1935 from the Motion Picture Follow The Fleet, called Let's Face The Music And Dance. It's played in the Key of C with dreamy altered chords in 4/4 tempo. Here's the sheet music chords for the piano from The Best of Diana Krall. Keep in mind that what you're playing is not necessarily Diana Krall's arrangement.


 "Let's Face The Music And Dance"

Intro

C/G  Am7/G  Dm7  Dm7/G  C6  Ebm6  Dm7b5  G7#5

   Cm                                       Cm6  Cm(maj7)  Cm7
There may be trouble ahead
 Cm                                             Dm7b5  G7 C                   Cmaj9 C9
But while there's moonlight and music and love and romance
 F6                 Fm6           C/E  Ebm6  Dm7  G7#5
Let's face the music and dance
Cm                                        Cm6  Cm7
Before the fiddlers have fled
 G7              Ab7        D7/A  D7 Dm7/G G7      F/G  G7         C  Cmaj9  C9
Before they ask us to pay the bill and while we still have the chance
 F6                 Fm6          C/E  Cdim/Eb  Dm7  C
Let's face the music and dance

 Ab    Eb9              Ab                 Eb9              Ab                        G7  F/A  Bbm  G7/B
Soon we'll be without the moon, humming a different tune and then
 Cm                                         Cm6  Cm(maj7)  Cm7
There may be teardrops to shed
 Cm                                             Dm7b5 G7 C             Cmaj9  C9
So while there's moonlight and music and love and romance
 F6                  Fm6   C/E  D7   D7/A  Ab7b5
Let's face the music and dance, dance.
  C/G  Am7/G   Dm7  Dm7/G C6   G7#5(b9)  C6
   Let's face the music and dance.

Slash Chords (Not in any order)

L.H. / R.H.

Cm = CC/EbGC
Cm7 = CC/GCEbG
Dm7b5 = DD/AbCG
G7 = GG/FBD
C = CC/GDF
Cmaj9 = G/BDEG
C9 = CC/BbDEG
F6 = FC/AD
Fm6 = FD/AbD
C/E =  EC/GC
Ebm6 = EbGb/CGbBb
Dm7b5 = DF/CFAb
G7#5 = GF/BD#G
C6 = CC/ACEbG
Ab7 = AbAb/GbCEb
D7/A = AA/F#CD
D7 = DD/CF#A
Dm7/G = GG/DFA, DD/BFG
Cdim/Eb = EbC/Gb
Dm7 = DC/FC
Ab = AbAb/CEbAbC
Eb9 = Eb/BbDbFBb
F/A = AA/FC
Bbm = BbBb/FDbG
G7/B = BB/FD
Ab7b5 = AbAbFC
C/G = GG/EGCE
Am7/G = GA/EGCE
C6 = CC/CEGAC
G7#5(b9) = GF/BEbAb
C6 = CG/EA

You may be interested in ChristmasKeys 1

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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey
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