Monday Music Quote: Author Unknown


Monday Music Quote: Author Unknown

MUSIC IS WHAT FEELINGS SOUND LIKE ~
-- Author Unknown

There's a couple of songs that come to mind with 'feeling' in the song title. I'm thinking music  from the 70s. Can you think of some others?


Peaceful Easy Feeling


Intro:
E  Esus4 (x4)

E            A                          E            A

I like the way your sparkling earrings lay
E                 A         B7       A
against your skin,so brown
E                  A                             E           A
and I wanna sleep with you in the desert tonight
E                    A          B7
with a billion stars all around

Chorus:
                      A                    E
'cause I gotta peaceful easy feeling
A                                               F#m   B7
and I know you won't let me down
                E   F#m        A       B7
'cause I'm al  -  ready standing     on the ground

E  Esus4  (x2)

E                   A             E       A
And I found out a long time ago
E                           A                B7     A
what a woman can do to your soul
E             A                        E      A
Ah, but she can't take you anyway
E                            A                B7
You don't already know how to go
 
Chorus

E  Esus4  (x2)

Instrumental Verse and Chorus

E (hold)     A (hold)          E      A
I get this feeling I may know you
E      A                B7     A
as a lover and a friend
E                                A            E               A
but this voice keeps whispering in my other ear, tells me
E                    A             B7
I may never see you again

Chorus #2:
                      A                    E
'cause I get a peaceful, easy feeling
A                                               F#m   B7
and I know you won't let me down
                E   F#m        A       B7
'cause I'm al  -  ready standing
               E   F#m        A       B7
'cause I'm al  -  ready standing
               E   F#m        A       B7
Yes, I’m al  -  ready standing
             
on the ground

E   F#m   A    B7  (x3)

 

Feeling Good - Nina Simone

 


Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D       
Birds flying high you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Sun in the sky you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Reeds driftin’ on by you know how I feel

Gm
It’s a new dawn
Gm/F
It’s a new day
Gm/Eb
It’s a new life
Gm/D       C D   
F-o-r     me
And I’m feeling good
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D
  

Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Fish in the sea you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
River running free you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Blossom in the tree you know how I feel

Gm
It’s a new dawn
Gm/F
It’s a new day
Gm/Eb
It’s a new life
Gm/D       C D   
F-o-r     me
And I’m feeling good
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  


Gm         Gm/F      Gm/Eb      Gm/D  
Dragonfly out in the sun you know what I mean, don’t you know
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Butterflies all havin’ fun you know what I mean
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  
Sleep in peace when day is done

That’s what I mean

Gm
And this old world 
Gm/F
is a new world
Gm/Eb
And a bold world
Gm/D       C D   
F-o-r     me
And I’m feeling good
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D  

Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D
Stars when you shine you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D
Scent of the pine you know how I feel
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D
Oh freedom is mine
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D
And I know how I feelGm
It’s a new dawn
Gm/F
It’s a new day
Gm/Eb
It’s a new life
Gm/D       C D   
F-o-r     me
And I’m feeling good
Gm       Gm/F      Gm/Eb       Gm/D 
 
Hey, I just want to give a shout out to Canada and Ontario, California! 
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 "Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Only Trust Your Heart: Diana Krall

Cover of "Only Trust Your Heart"
Cover of Only Trust Your Heart


Sammy Cahn wrote the lyrics to Only Trust Your Heart with music by Benny Carter. Now, I think that Diana Krall recorded the song in 1995. Here's a video in case you're not familiar with it.



I absolutely love Diana Krall. Great voice and jazz pianist... Besides being beautiful, too!

 

Lyrics and Chords 

 

 F                       B7                       Em7                  Am
Never trust the stars when you're about to fall in love
 Dm                     G7  +                  C          Gm7 C7(b9)
Look for hidden signs before you start to sigh
 F                        B7                        Em7                  Am
Never trust the moon when you're about to taste his kiss
 Dm                      G7  +5                   C9           Gm7   Gb7
He knows all the lines and he knows how to lie
 F    Am            Dm
Just wait for a night
F              Bm7(b5)       E7+              Am  Am7 Abm7  Gm7 C7
When the skies are all bare and then if you still care
F                           B7                               Em7             Am
Never trust your dreams when you're about to fall in love
 Dm                                 G7                                                                                        
For your dreams may quickly fall apart
    Dm7      Fm7  Bb7 C       Em7 A7
So if you're smart, really smart
Ab9   +5  G9sus G7 (b9)  C  G7 (b9) C
Only trust your heart
Just wait for a night
When the skies are all bare and then if you still care
Never trust your dreams when you're about to fall in love
For your dreams may quickly fall apart
So if you're smart, really smart
Only trust your heart
Only trust your heart


 

 Lyrics in Spanish


 só confie no seu coração
nunca confie nas estrelas quando você estiver perto de se apaixonar
olhe para os sinais que guiam antes de começar a suspirar
nunca confie na lua
quando você estiver perto de experimentar o beijo dele
ele conhece todos os caminhos
e ele sabe como mentir
só espere por uma noite
quando o céus estiverem descobertos
se você ainda se importar
nunca confie nos seus sonhos
quando você estiver perto de se apaixonar
pois seus sonhos podem desmoronar rapidamente
então se você se sentir pequeno
realmente pequeno
confie somente em seu coração


 

Chord Breakdown (random chords throughout the song)

F = F/CEFA
Fm7 = F/AbC
Bb7(b5) = Bb/G#BbDE
Bb7 = Bb/DGBb
B7 = BA/D#AD
Em7 = E/BDG
Am = A/CEC
Am7 = A/EGC
Abm7 = Ab/EbGbCb
A7 = A/C#E
Ab9 = Ab/GbBC
Dm = DD/DF
Dm7 = D/FD
G7 = G/BEB    /+ = BD#B
C = C/CE and C/EGAC
C7 = CC/BbE
Gm7 = GF/BbDBbD
C7(b9) = CBb/EG#ADb
C9 = C/BbDE
Gb7 = E/BDbGbBb
G7(b9) = G/FAbBD
Bm7(b5) = BFA/D
E7+ = EG#/DC

So, do you have a favorite song by Diana Krall?
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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Pentatonic Practice

Piano Diana: Pentatonic Practice


 Continuing with the final part of an article by Chain Burstein. He holds a M.M. in Jazz Studies from the University of the arts in Philadelphia and a B.M. from Berklee College of Music. He currently is residing in Philadelphia where he is working as an active musician and educator.

Running Changes

Pentatonics are not confined to only model and free jazz improvisations. In fact, pentatonics can provide the improvisor with a break from his or her 'stock licks' when running changes. To break away from the scalar, or arpeggiated lines of your typical ii-V-I, I have provided two different ways of approaching the progression with pentatonics. Utilize a pentatonic pattern built upon 4ths and 2nds. The formula for the ascending pattern is as follows: skip (up), step (down), skip (up), step (down). The descending pattern would read: skip (down), step (up), skip (down), step (up). Although both examples utilize the same pattern, they each approach the progression differently.

Example: ii-V-I

Dm7                               /  G7alt                                     /  CMaj7

G, B, A, D... B, E, D, G /  Ab, C, Bb, Eb... C, F, E, Ab / G, B, A, D... B, E, D, G... E, A, G, B

The above example is a typical ii-V-I in the key of C. The pentatonics played over  each chord are as follows: Dm7 = G pentatonic, G7Alt = Ab pentatonic and CMay7 = G pentatonic. The resulting line is effective for several reasons. First, there is a pattern which our ear naturally gravitates towards. second, each pattern begins on the root of its respective pentatonic, making it easier for our ears to recognize. Lastly, the pentatonic patterns move around in half steps. Half step resolutions are very powerful and can often warrant the use of so called 'wrong notes'. The first example contains a so-called 'wrong note' in the second bar. Even though the 4th is an avoid note on the V7alt, our ears justify the 'wrong note' because of the consistency created by both the pentatonic pattern and its chromatic movement between each chord change.

The second example displays the same ii-V-I progression with different pentatonics superimposed over each chord. They are as follows: Dm7 = C pentatonic, G7Alt = Db pentatonic, and CMaj7 = D pentatonic. We still have chromatic movement between each pentatonic pattern. However, instead of creating the sound of parallel structures by starting from the root of each pentatonic as in the first example. The second example below sounds more like one continuous idea based upon an intervallic line. This result is achieve by starting the new pattern as close as possible to where the last pattern left off.

Example: ii-V-I

Dm7                             / G7Alt                                     / CMaj7

C, E, D, G- E, A, G, C / Bb, Eb, Db, F.-Eb, Ab, F, Bb / A, E, F#, D- E, B, D, A- B, F#, A, E, F#, D, E

Pentatonic Practice

Hopefully, the techniques and skills outlined in this article have shed some light on the many uses of the pentatonic scale... Always remember to experiment with your own patterns and ideas as well. Oftentimes improvisors see a chord or a scale and forget that jazz is about thinking 'outside the box'. Your own ear will always be your best guide as to what works and what doesn't.

Heading out for a mini vacation. I'm attending a worship conference. Talk with you next week!

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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

The Power of Pentatonics

Minor pentatonic blues scale on A
Minor pentatonic blues scale on A (Photo credit: Wikipedia)




 Last time we discussed the Pentatonic Scale and Pentatonic Patterns. Chaim Burstein said, "Your own ear will always be your best guide as to what works and what doesn't." Let's continue with his very informative article.

Chord Scale Relationships

 

Most heptatonic scales such as locrian and lydian are useful for only one type of chord or another. In contrast, pentatonic scales may be used for over a dozen different chord sounds. There are 12 different uses of the pentatonic scale. There are chord types, like Major, Minor, Dominant, Altered Dominant, Sus4, Half Diminished,etc. Then there are scale degrees from which to build the major pentatonic and then we have the chord tones and tensions that each chord/scale relationship will produce. Thus, when the improvisor is given the chord CMaj7, he has the option of playing a pentatonic from the root 9th or 5th  of the chord.

Generally, the easiest way to apply these new chord/scale options is by practicing them over modal or static chord progressions.

Modal/Free Playing

 

Many improvisors complain of feeling boxed in or trapped by modal tunes and free playing over ostinatos. Pentatonics can provide a tonal framework with which to create new sounds that are not only interesting but structurally coherent as well.

Chord / Scale Options

 

CMaj7

C, D, E, G... D, E, G, A / D, E, F#, A... E, F, A, B / G, A, B, D... A, B, D, E / D, C, A, G, A

There are three possible chord/scale options for the chord CMaj7. (See above example) Notice how the  scalar pattern (from the last lesson) creates a consistency that links each new chord sound to the previous one.

Side Sweeping

 

CMaj7

C, D, E, G... D, E, G, A / Db, Eb, F, Ab... Eb, F, Ab, Bb / C, A, G, E... A, G, E, D / G, E, D, C, A

A technique known as 'side-stepping' is shown above. In this example the improvisor defines the tonal center by clearly outlining a C major pentatonic scale in the first measure. Upon reaching the second measure, you play the same pattern a 1/2 step above from Db, thus taking the listener 'outside' of the prescribed harmony. Measures 3-4 bring the listener back 'inside' the changes by playing the descending version of the original C major pentatonic sequence.

You can combine the concept of alternative chord/scale options with side-stepping. Try playing the examples below and creating a few of your own. Notice how your ear recognizes the sequence and thus accepts each transposition of the pentatonic scale as a development of the previous idea.

Chord / Scale Options & Side Stepping Combined

 

CMaj7

C, D, E, G...Ab, F, Eb, Db / D, E, F#, A... Bb, G, F, Eb / E, F#, G#, B... C, A, G, E / D, C, D, E, G

To be continued... more later.

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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Pentatonics Power


Piano Diana: Pentatonic Scale
                                                        Photo Credit: FreeDigitalPhoto.net

 Awhile back, I wrote a post on The power of altered pentatonics. My husband plays the guitar and I always hear him playing pentatonic scales. I recently read an article by Chaim Burstein and thought I would share some of the highlights with my readers. This is good stuff to know.

The Pentatonic Scale

Technically, a pentatonic scale is any scale with five notes per octave. In practice however, there are only a handful of useful pentatonic scales. There are two common forms of the pentatonic scale: the major pentatonic and its relative minor pentatonic. Pentatonic scales can help musicians achieve a more structurally focused intervallic approach to their lines.

The major and minor pentatonics are made up of five notes and can be used interchangeably. 


C, D, E, G... A, C, D, E... G, A, C,  rest. (play 4 sets of notes as eighth notes).

Example: A Minor Pentatonic Scale

A, C, D, E... G, A, C, D... E, G, A, rest.
Some musicians prefer to think of the scale as a major pentatonic, while others tend to think of the scale in its minor form. Personally, I'd rather think of the scale as a major pentatonic; so from now on, the term "pentatonic" will refer only to the major form of the pentatonic scale. If you prefer to think of these scales as minor, you may convert to minor simply by starting the scale on the last note of the major pentatonic.

Pentatonic Patterns

Pentatonics can assist students with assimilating new scales and sounds into their repertoire. Pentatonic patterns can be categorized as either scalar or intervallic. In general, scalar patterns tend to use adjacent notes, whereas intervallic patterns tend to skip around the scale.

Example: Scalar Pattern (play 4 sets of notes as 16th notes)

C, D, E, G... D, E, G, A... E, G, A, C... G, A, C, D /
A, C, D, E... C, D, E, G... G, E, D, C... E, D, C, A /
D, C, A, G... C, A, G, E... A, G, E, D... G, E, D, C /

Example: Intervallic Pattern

A, D, E, C... D, G, A, E... G, C, D, A... C, E, G, D /
E, A, C, G, A, rest /
C, G, E, A... G, D, C, E... D, A, G, C... A, E, D, G /
E, C, A, d, C, rest /

To simplify the explanation of these patterns, I will refer to steps and skips. A step will occur when the next note is an adjacent note, and a skip will occur when we skip over a note in the scale to play the next available note. Thus, we would describe the scalar pattern as step up, step up, step up, skip down. To play the same pattern in reverse, we simply invert the formula. Thus, we have step down, step down, step down, skip up. An intervallic pattern is based upon 4ths and 2nds. The formula for this pattern would read: skip up, step up, skip down, step up. The revers pattern would read: skip down, step down, skip up, step down.

These patterns are useful in a number of ways. First, it familiarizes the student with the scale and forces them to internalize the notes involved. second, when developing as intervallic approach, these patterns will tie together two seemingly disparate tonal centers through their structural consistency. In order to have enough material to generate interesting lines, I have my students create several intervallic and scalar patterns of their own.

Next time, we'll talk about chord scale relationships and modal/ free playing.

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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Piano Related Word Clouds



Piano Diana: Word Cloud

 I'm looking forward to playing some music with all five of my grandchildren this week. With one piano and 2 keyboards, it will be a delight to hear their melodies and harmonies together. Since I won't be blogging or sharing chord charts and music articles with you this week, I did want to share with you a fun place online where you can make your own word clouds for your sites or personal use. They are so easy to make and you can find them at, http://www.tagxedo.com/

Wishing everyone a Happy 4th of July!

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"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey
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