WOG Unity Ride- Sept. 20, 2008



I just want to take a few seconds and share some thoughts with you.

This ride is ALL abut what Jesus told us to do.
Visit the ones in prison, help the orphans and widows, and BE united.
As the days and weeks go by, I want to encourage you to lift others in prayer.
When you are driving to work, riding to an event this weekend, and especially when life gets to you,
Lift others in prayer. Lift up in prayer the ones that you love and the ones that are hard to love.
Lift up in prayer the ones that you haven’t prayed for in sometime. Lift up in prayer the ones that hurt you the most.
Pray that someone will reach out to them as we are reaching to the ones behind bars that hurt others.
We are breaking that chain of bondage by visiting them and bringing their kids toys, so pray that someone will reach the ones that hurt you the same way. By praying for them – even if you don’t like them – you are telling God that you trust Him with your situation. One day, you’ll get the call, or hear about the person you once prayed for and once again, you will Thank God for being faithful. There are ONLY two things that I will always ask of you.

1. Pray for others
2. The day of the ride, to matter what city you’re in, invite someone to ride with you, that does not know Jesus.


This Ride is expanding rapidly throughout the country and we will be touching many lives together.
As I often say it is beyond my comprehension and in God’s handlebars.

The link below is part of a Daystar program in Houston TX talking about this year’s Ride... or view below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lEsULTPot4&NR=1





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Five Year Old Blind Genius Pianist

This child prodigy is currently in Singapore. You have to check out this video. She has an amazing ability to play by ear and is able to play accompaniment just by listening to someone sing. She is only five years old and blind, but Yoo Ye-Eun's little hands find the right notes on the black and white keys of her piano...



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Ballade Pour Adeline




I have always loved this song and the sound of the 6th interval. The Composer of Ballade Pour Adeline is Paul De Senneville. For those who read notes, I have posted them.
Enjoy the videos! (Richard Clayderman)






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Voicing Chords


What is chord voicing? Well, voicing is how many notes are played, the distance between each of the notes and the quantity and quality of extensions.

There are many, many ways to play a single chord. There are also tons of ways to play chord progressions, considering that each chord can be played many different ways. It’s a good idea to start off with a few simple possibilities instead of hundreds.

For example, take a Cmaj7 chord. The chord is simple and is made up of C E G and B. Depending on how rich you want the chord to sound, you can also add D and A to the chord as extensions because D and A come from the C major scale and do not clash with the basic chord.

These are what we call extensions. In other words a good pianist will already consider D and A in their chord voicing when they see the chord symbol Cmaj7. It doesn’t have to be written Cmaj7 (9 13) for them to understand this.

So, how would a pianist then voice this chord? Well, for starters, that depends on the melody. Whatever the melody note is will become the highest note of the chord. For example, let’s say D is the melody note of prominence while the chord is being played. That means that for a pianist our 9th is already understood as part of the chord and is the top note.

It’s a good idea to play the bass note in the left hand which is C of course. Then the next 2 most important notes are the 3rd and the 7th because these notes give the chord its flavor. Consider playing the 7th in the left hand above the bass note. That would mean playing the C with finger 5 (baby finger) and B with finger 1 (thumb).

Then, play the 3rd, 5th and melody (9th) in the right hand with the 1st, 2nd and 5th fingers respectively. What’s left? The 13th or A which, you can cover with the 3rd finger of the right hand. So, from bottom to top you would have the notes in this order; C B E G A and D. That right there is a very rich sounding chord.

This is only one way of voicing the chord. Learn one way at a time until it becomes second nature. Voicing the root and 7th in the left hand and covering the 3rd and the melody in the right hand is a very good system to start with. Then with your left over fingers in the right hand cover the 5th and any other extension that’s available. This works for all chords including major, minor, dominant and diminished chords.

It's fun to learn ways of voicing chords!





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What Are Shape Notes?


Shape notes, according to Southern Gospel School of America director C. Nelson Bailey, are shapes — rather than round notes — that mark each note on the musical scale. The shapes are an easy way to teach and make it easier for students to site read music, he said. “So when you look at a song for the very first time, once you know the shapes and you know the relationships between the shapes, when you see in the piece of music a note going from do up to fa, you know what that should sound like, and so you can much more easily sing that interval than if it was just the round notes,” Mr. Bailey said.
http://www.media.timesfreepress.com

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Why Study Music?


If you’re learning adult piano lessons, it can be rewarding for both teacher and student. Playing piano as an adult is a good way to relieve stress – listening to music is a good stress reliever, so playing it works even better. Many adults think that it’s impossible to learn to play the piano, but this isn’t true.

Take some time to figure out what style you really want to play – maybe classical piano not for you and you want to try rock piano, blues piano or jazz piano. Some people don’t even really want to learn to read music but just improvise chords and learn to play basic melodies.

It’s like learning a new language or a martial art or something similar; it takes practice to become skilled and to notice your growth. And try to have fun with it – just because you’re not playing the Fifth Symphony by Beethoven doesn’t mean you’re not really a piano player. Remembering to be patient with yourself and willing to accept instruction will help you to become a better piano player and person.

Link



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4th of July!


Just on my way to see the fireworks with my family, I stopped off at the local grocery store to pick up some water bottles. I happened to notice a message that someone had left on the asphalt parking lot.(Nobody cares) Their cry for help hit my heart so deeply, that I got out my camera and took the picture. Those words were embedded in my mind and I knew there was a visual response, an answer if you will, that someone does care!




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Funny Thing Happened On My Way To Blogger


A funny thing happened on my way to blogger...
I met three unique bloggers that totally impressed me with their style and creative writing. I found my world colliding with theirs. Bonding with so much we had in common and yet we were all so different. Each special path, every page written and every photo warmly shared, echoed in my mind that it is indeed a small world and my life is forever changed. So, I celebrate the birth of this new blog. You see, you never know what will be waiting for you right around the corner. But then, that's another story!


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