Diane Birch: Chords to Fools

singer-songwriter Diane Birch


I was first introduced to Diane Birch watching 'Live at Daryl's House' on the television. Let me tell first off, this gal is mega-talented. I loved her from the beginning with her 'Carole King' type voice and she sure can play the keys... I believe the violin, too. Are you familiar with this young lady? Check her out on YouTube.

There's a couple of songs that I really like. Nothing Close To A Miracle and Fools are very popular.

Here's a chord chart to Fools and here's the video on YouTube.





 intro: C#/Eb Ebm
C#/Eb   Ebm C#/Eb          Ebm   C#/Eb          Ebm
Fo-     ols knockin' on my door, calling out my name

C#/Eb         Eb        Eb7
Tellin' me to change my ways but I know

Abm7             C#7  Abm7              C#7
Two hands in the fire won't put out the flame

Abm7             C#                  Ebm
Yeah, I got your number, I know your game

              Abm7   C#7             F#      B  Bsus4 B
So why should I-     I lay it on the li-     -ne?

Abm7              Bbm7    Ebm             C#  Ebm
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a   plan

            Abm7  C#7                     F#  B    Bsus4 B
You tell me li-   ies, you look me in the e-  yes

    Abm7                 Bbm7             Ebm  C# Ebm
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain

(the rest of the song is just as before)

Fools lying in my bed, laughin' in my head
Telling me my dream's gone cold but I know
One city of angels, it ain't goin' put out my flame
Ooh, my love is a fire, no one can tame
So why should I lay it on the line?
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain
Why should I lay it on the line?
Well, everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain


Chord Breakdown


I know you're familiar with the chords but just in case...


C# = C# F G#

Ebm = Eb Gb Bb

Eb = Eb G Bb

Eb7 = Eb G Bb Db

Abm7 = Ab B Eb Gb

C#7 = C# F G# B

F# = F# Bb Db

B = B D# F#

B4 = B E F#

One more chord chart:

D#m C#

D#m  C#
Foolsknockin' on my door, calling out my name
D#m C#                                  B         
Tellin' me to change my ways but I know
                   C# B                   C# B
Two hands in the fire won't put out the flame
                     C#                 C#m
Yeah, I got your number, I know your game

 
              B  C#             F#  C#
So why should I lay it on the line?
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
             B  C#                    F# C#
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain

D#m  C#

D#m  C#
Fools lying in my bed, laughin' in my head
D#m  C#                                   B
Telling me my dream's gone cold but I know
                 C# B                        C# B
One city of angels, it ain't goin' put out my flame
                     C#               C#m
Ooh, my love is a fire, no one can tame


              B  C#             F#  C#
So why should I lay it on the line?
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
             B  C#                    F# C#
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain

C# B 
              B  C#             F#  C#
why So why should I lay it on the line?
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
well Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
             B  C#                    F# C#
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain


B  C# F#  C#

 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
Everybody's got a vision, everybody's got a plan
             B  C#                    F# C#
You tell me lies, you look me in the eyes
 G#m                 C#     B                D#m
But honey I would rather stand out in the rain

Diane Birch - Bible Belt

All the best,







"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Monday Music Quote: Leo Robin

Monday Music Quote

"But square-cut or pear-shape, these rocks don't lose their shape!"
Leo Robin (1900-1984), U.S. songwriter. "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend," Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, J.J.Robbins & Sons, Inc. (1949). Music composed by Jule Styne (1905-1994). 

Paris Forever In Song 

1926: Leo Robin's hit song "Paree!" Lindbergh's solo flight from N.Y. to Paris

1928: George Gershwin's An American in Paris. Cole Porter's musical Paris, including "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love." Cole Porter's Revue des Ambassadeurs produced in Paris.

1929: Leo Robbin's hit song "Louis" from the film The Innocents of Paris. Cole Porter's musical Fifty Million Frenchmen, including "Do You Want to See Paris," "Paree, What Did You Do to Me?" and "You Don't Know Pardee." Gertrude Lawrence stars in the film The Battle of Paris; music by Cole Porter.

1930: Leo Robbin's hit song "My Ideal" from the film The Playboy of Paris. Cole Porter's musical The New Yorkers includes "Love for Sale," inspired by Porter's conversation with a Montmartre taxi-dancer.

1931: Porter's Fifty Million Frenchmen made into a film. Hit song "Under a Roof in Paris" (English lyric by Irving Caeser) from the film Sous les Toits de Paris.

1932: Yip Harburg and Vernon Duke write the classic "April in Paris" for the Broadway review Walk a Little Faster.

C'est Si Bon

Words & Music by Andre Hornez & Henry Betti
English lyric by Jerry Seelen
Recorded by Louis Armstrong, 1949


C#m7-5 Cm7-5 Bm7  Bm7-5  E7       E7/9  E7       A      D9  Bm7-5  A
"C'est   si  bon" --        lovers say that in France

          Fdim         Bm7  Bm7-5  E7
When they thrill to romance;

             Bm7-5 E7 A6     Cdim  E7/9
It means that it's so good.


C#m7-5 Cm7-5 Bm7  Bm7-5  E7        E7/9  E7     A   D9  Bm7-5  A
C'est   si   bon --           so I say   it to you

          Fdim         Bm7  Bm7-5  E7
Like the French people do

            Bm7-5 E7  A
Because it's oh,  so good.



Bridge:


A7    F            Dm7       CM7/6  CM7
Ev'ry word, ev'ry sigh, ev'ry kiss, dear,

         B7         Bm7   Bm7-5      E7 
Leads to only one thought, and it's this, dear:


C#m7-5 Cm7-5 Bm7  Bm7-5  E7         E7/9 E7     A    D9  Bm7-5  A
It's    so   good,          nothing else can replace

           Fdim        Bm7  Bm7-5  E7
Just your slightest embrace

                 Em7     F#7
And if you only would

      Bm7 Dm7                    AM7
Be my own     for the rest of my days,

A                    A7    Bm7-5  E7
I will whisper this phrase,



First Time:

   Bm7-5    E7/9  E7  A Edim  E7 
My darling, c'est si bon.



Last Time:

   Bm7-5    E7/9  E7  A  D9   A6
My darling, c'est si bon.




Best,





"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey
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School Days: Chuck Berry


Chuck Berry

One of my grandsons will be starting Kindergarten on Monday, August 12... Oh my, that's today! It is such big doings around here because all the schools start on the same day here in SoCal. How is it where you are? Anyways, the song School Days kept running through my head and just maybe it will make a connection with you. Do you remember it? It's really pretty basic. In fact, you may remember some of these songs at, music-and-sounds-of-50s-progression.html


Chuck Berry: School Days Lyrics





Up in the mornin' and out to school
The teacher is teachin' the golden rule
American history and practical math
You studyin' hard and hopin' to pass
Workin' your fingers right down to the bone
And the guy behind you won't leave you alone
Ring, ring goes the bell
The cook in the lunch room's ready to sell
You're lucky if you can find a seat
You're fortunate if you have time to eat
Back in the classroom, open your books
Keep up the teacher don't know how mean she looks
Soon as three o'clock rolls around
You finally lay your burden down
Close up your books, get out of your seat
Down the halls and into the street
Up to the corner and 'round the bend
Right to the juke joint, you go in
Drop the coin right into the slot
You're gotta hear somethin' that's really hot
With the one you love, you're makin' romance
All day long you been wantin' to dance
Feeling the music from head to toe
Round and round and round you go
Drop the coin right into the slot
You're gotta hear somethin' that's really hot
With the one you love, you're makin' romance
All day long you been wantin' to dance
Feelin' the music from head to toe
Round and round and round you go
Hail, hail rock and roll
Deliver me from the days of old
Long live rock and roll
The beat of the drums, loud and bold
Rock, rock, rock and roll
The feelin' is there, body and soul



Wikipedia Says:

"School Days" (also known as "School Day (Ring! Ring! Goes the Bell)") is a song written and recorded by rock and roll icon Chuck Berry, released by the Chess record label as a single in March 1957, and released on the LP After School Session two months later (see 1957 in music).[1] It is one of his best known songs and is often considered a rock and roll anthem. It was first released as a single and later appeared as the lead track on Berry's first album, After School Session." 

For more information, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_Days

Ring, Ring Goes The Bell





Chords to School Days

G
Up in the mornin' and out to school,

The teacher is teachin' the Golden Rule,
G7                               C
American history and practical math,
                                 G
You study 'em hard and hopin' to pass.
                                        D
Workin' your fingers right down to the bone,
                                        G
And the guy behind you won't leave you alone.

G
Ring, ring goes the bell.

The cook in the lunch room's ready to sell.
G7                              C
You're lucky if you can find a seat,
                                     G
You're fortunate if you have time to eat.
                                  D
Back in the classroom, open your books,
                                              G
Gee, but the teacher don't know how mean she looks.

G
Soon as three o'clock rolls around,

You finally lay your burden down.
G7                                    C
Close up your books, get out of your seat,
                             G
Down the halls and into the street.
                                 D
Up to the corner and 'round the bend,
                                G
Right to the juke joint, you go in.

Instrumental:  G   G   C   G   D   C7   G
G
Drop the coin right into the slot,

You're gotta hear somethin' that's really hot.
G7                                    C
With the one you love, you're makin'romance,
                                  G
All day long you been wantin' to dance,
                                D
Feeling the music from head to toe,
                              G
Round and round and round you go.

G
Hail, hail rock and roll!

Deliver me from the days of old,
G7                  C
Long live rock and roll,
                                G
The beat of the drums, loud and bold.
                      D
Rock, rock, rock and roll,
                                G
The feelin' is there, body and soul.

After School Session

Wishing everyone a great school year ahead!






"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey

Learn a Jazz Tune in Three Steps


 1. Melody

From an accurate lead sheet, play through the melody from three to 10 times with a metronome set to a medium tempo.

After you find yourself playing the song while not really reading the notes anymore, turn the sheet over and play it again from memory. If you make a mistake, just continue playing to the end of the melody.

If you weren't able to play all of the melody correctly, try to play through the part where you made the mistake, still without looking at the lead sheet. If you can't play it correctly without looking at the music, turn the lead sheet over, take a look at the area in question, play through that part two to four times, and then cover up the sheet music and play that section of the song again from memory.

If successful, play through the entire melody from memory again. If not, play the part where you made the mistake, from the sheet music again five to 10 times and again without looking at the music, and then try to play the whole song from memory once again.

Repeat this sequence until you're completely comfortable playing the song from memory.

2. Chord Roots

Now turn the lead sheet over so you can see the melody and chords again.

With a metronome, play through the roots of the chords in time.

you could simply play quarter notes, or make up a syncopated rhythm as illustrated in this example:

While playing chord roots may not be as overly compelling as the typical melody, you will find that they very often carry a sublime interest and charm in themselves. This is especially true of songs with unusual progressions such as "Stella by Starlight," "I Remember You," and "Invitation."

Memorize the roots of the chords in the same manner as you memorized the melody. Again, if you make a mistake go back as many times as is necessary to be able to play it from memory.

Example: "Come Rain Or Come Shine"

Fmaj7  E-7  A7  D-7

3. Chord Qualities

Take a look at the lead sheet again and play 1, 3, 5 of each chord.

For example:

Play this pattern through the chord changes three to 10 times at a moderate metronome setting.

"My Foolish Heart"

BbMaj7  EbMaj7  D-7  G7

Chordal and rhythmic accuracy along with feel is the goal here, not speed. Once you've memorized this pattern, try a new one, such as 1, 7, 3.

Out Of Nowhere

Gmaj7  Bb-7  Eb7

There are an abundance of permutations that are possible.* You might spend hours, days, or  even weeks on one song when you apply a multitude of permutations to a song's chord progression. This is a good exercise for your fingers, ears, and mind. The more variety of ways you play the chords, the better you will know the song and the chords themselves.

As you use this method, each successive song that you learn will come more quickly than the one before as your mind becomes more familiar with the process and the different types of chords.

Apply this method to any song, and you will be able to play the melody and improvise over it from a position of melodic and chordal knowledge. Couple this with broader musical experience, and you'll be able to offer a relaxed and natural musical performance.

* 1, 3, 5, 7
   3, 5, 7, 9
   7, 3, 5
   7, 3, 9
   1, 2, 3, 4, 5
   5, 4, 3, 2, 1
   1, 10, 7
   1, 10, 5
   et cetera

I hope you like this article. It was written by Ed Marlow, a composer and saxophonist who has played with Tony Bennett and the orchestras of Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey.

Now, have you heard about Hear and Play's Jazz Course? If you like Jazz and are interested in more studies, visit Jazz Intensive Training Center







"Jazz washes away the dust of every day life." -- Art Blakey
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