Music Quotes: Albert Einstein and Les Paul

 
 
 
 "It occurred to me by intuition, and music was the driving force behind
that intuition. My discovery was the result of musical perception."
(When asked about his theory of relativity) 
        - Albert Einstein
 
Here's a 50's smash hit from Les Paul and Mary Ford
 
 
 
 
A7                Dm7                  Dm7  G7
Somewhere there's music, how faint the tune.
                  Cm7                  Cm7    F7
Somewhere there's heaven, how high the moon?
Bb+7        Em-5            A7      Am7       Em7-5
There is no moon above when love is far away, too.
     A7       D9         Em7      A7     Fm7    F7 Em7
Till it comes true, that you love me, as I love you.

#2.
    Em7   A7      Dm7                  Dm7  G7
Somewhere there's music, how near, how far?
                  Cm7                    Cm7 F7
Somewhere there's heaven, it's where you are.
    Bb      Em7-5                A7                   Dm7
The darkest night would shine if you would come to me soon.
A7-9      Fm7       F7       Em         Em7  A7-9  D6
Until you will, how still my heart, how high the   moon???


The earliest recorded hit version was by Benny Goodman & His Orchestra. It was recorded February 7, 1940 and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 35391, with the flip side "Fable of the Rose".[2] In 1948, bandleader Stan Kenton enjoyed some success with his version of the tune. The recording, with a vocal by June Christy, was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 911 (with the flip side "Willow, Weep for Me")[3] and 15117(with the flip side "Interlude").[4] It reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on July 9, 1948, its only week on the chart, at #27.[5]
The best-known recording of the song is by Les Paul and Mary Ford, made on January 4, 1951. The record was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 1451, with the flip side "Walkin' and Whistlin' Blues",[6] and spent 25 weeks (beginning on March 23, 1951) on the Billboard chart,[5] 9 weeks at #1. The record was subsequently re-released by Capitol as catalog number 1675, with "Josephine" on the B-side.[7]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_High_the_Moon

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